Most viewed Uddari posts 2008-2009

April 2008 – April 2009

In April 2008, Uddari Weblog was viewed over 600 times, by March 2009 the number had risen to 5000 views with the totals reaching 41000

Top Posts

Photo Album: Foto Mandli 2,361 views

Great Women of Punjabi Origin:
Punjab deyaN ManniaN PerwanniaN ZnaniaN
1,931 views

Punjabi Poems: NazmaN 1,758 views

Cultural Events: Rehtal Mehfli Varqa 1,670 views

Punjabi MaNboli Writers: Punjabi MaNboli Likhari 1,444 views

Punjabi MaNboli Publishers: Punjabi Maanboli Chhapay1,202 views

‘Sanjh’ A New Punjabi Literary Magazine 897 views

Slumbering Over Islamic Unity 887 views

All-Time Favorites
April 2008 – April 2009

Autobiography of the Great Dada Amir Haider Khan (1904-1986)

1. Royalty Rights in Punjabi Publishing

2. Royalties for Punjabi Language Authors

Modern Punjabi Literature at UBC: A glass half full!

Amarjit Chandan’s Poem being Carved in Stone in Oxfordshire

3. Author Royalties Down to Definitions in the Punjab

Post Retirement Positions for Musharraf

Bhagat Singh Shaheed Statue

Kishwar Naheed to Ahmad Faraz

‘Identity Card’ by Mahmoud Darwish in Punjabi

Lost and (Not) Found: Teen Idol Afzal Sahir

Kikli 13 July

THE SHOCK OF RECOGNITION: Looking at Hamerquist’s ‘Fascism and Anti-Fascism’ by J. Sakai

Yaar da Ditta Haar by Fauzia Rafiq

‘Porn Creation’ by Fauzia Rafiq

Most popular posts on Uddari pages

Sixty Years of Unflinching Beauty, 1948-2008

Kishwar Naheed: A Great Woman from the Punjab

Sophia Duleep Singh: A Great Punjabi Woman

Recent Raves
‘No Heer please, we’re Sikhs!’

Punjabi MaaNboli and the Punjabis-1

Uddari is One

April 11, Uddari Weblog is one year new!

134 Posts

300 Comments

295 approved

First post: April 11, 2008

Photo by Partap Singh Ahdan, Lahore 1943

Photo by Partap Singh Ahdan, Lahore 1943

Title: Aahu Chashm Ragini
Photo by: Partap Singh Ahdan
Sourced by: Amarjit Chandan

Post intended to be the first:
Royalty Rights in Punjabi Publishing

.

First Comment

‘It is so unfortunate that in the new provincial assembly there is no party/individual/group to voice the right of children to study in the mother tongue. maybe we need to start a signature campaign to promote the cause.’
Posted by: Chitrkar from lahorechitrkar@gmail.com
On: Home, Uddari Mudhla Warqa
Submitted: 2008/04/07 at 9:19pm

First Uddari Page:

Great Women of Punjabi Origin

Punjab deyaN ManniaN PerwanniaN ZnaniaN

Added on: 2008/04/20

Kewal Kaur, a Naxalite activist

Kewal Kaur, a Naxalite activist

.

First post

Kewal Kaur: A Great Punjabi Woman

Photo and information by

Amarjit Chandan


First Uddari blog site: Uddari Art Exhibition

First work of art: Shahid Mirza’s ‘Kala MaiNdha Bhaes’

In: Modern Art by Punjabis
On: May 23 2008

Punjabi Artists and Photographers at Uddari Art

Uddari Art Exhibition, the blog, began August 23rd with Shahid Mirza’s ‘kala Mainda Bhes'; and, in just over three months we already have the pleasure of viewing the work of over fifteen professional painters and photographers of Punjabi origin.

From Lahore, Chandigarh, New Delhi, London and Wales, our artists offer us unique styles, diverse forms and individual perspectives. The Creators deliver us our Punjab in images of color, and black and white; in paint and photography. Real and the unreal; pleasures and pain.
Painters
1. Kanwal Dhaliwal
2. Ayesha Farooq
3. Satish Gujral
4. Navpreet Kaur
5. Pran Nath Mago
6. Shahid Mirza
7. Sidharth
8. SL Parasher
9. Iqbal Rasheed
10. Prem Singh
Photographers
1. Amarjit Chandan
2. Marek Jakubowski
3. Diwan Manna
4. Subhash Parihar
5. Gurvinder Singh
6. Prem Singh

View works displayed in the following themes:
Exhibition
- Modern Art by Punjabis
- City Spirit: Shahr Aatma
- Partition: The Punjab 1947
- Punjab Landscape
- People Punjab: Portraits and Groups
- Windows, Doors and Dwellings

‘Sunday Afternoon at Lahore Canal’ a video by Shahid Mirza

Shahid Mirza has created a highly pleasant video experience on the life by the Canal in Lahore. The afternoon on Lahore Canal in the Summer of 2006, is a scene happening everywhere by the canals, ponds, rivers, pools, marshes and puddles in the rural and urban Punjab.

Though male-exclusive, the scene is alive and infectiously festive. The visual is deceptive in that in the first few moments, and barring all noises, it seems as if it is Punjabi countryside; but then, the road becomes visible, and there, we have a bustling city life of Lahore by the Canal on a Sunday afternoon.

In the scorching heat of Lahore, running water is a necessity that becomes a luxury to the less privileged citizens of Lahore and surrounding areas. As apparent by the notice board shown at the beginning of the video, even when the local authorities have prohibited bathing and washing in the Canal, people are happily using it to wash themselves, their clothes, linen, sheep, rickshaws, fruits, and anything else that needs washing and is portable. The youth is practicing long and high dives, dips and floats; BhangRas are happening; and, leg-pullings are on.

The people interviewed in the video show no confidence in the local authorities to spend any money for the development of the Lahore Canal area as a park for public to make it easy, safe and more accessible for the people. Lahoris simply disregard the ‘prohibtion notice’ because their need to have such a public space is too great in the summer.

The video is available for viewing on YouTube in Punjabi and English sub-titles. The English version has Malika Taranum Noor Jehan’s popular public-domain song ‘SanooN nehr walae pul te bula ke te khaurae mahi tkithay reh gya‘ (After agreeing to meet with us at the bridge of the Canal, i wonder where my Lover has been detained) as the background music, and it is amazing how well it goes with the whole action in the video.

Enjoy viewing.

Sunday Afternoon at Lahore Canal by Shahid Mirza: Punjabi

Sunday Afternoon at Lahore Canal by Shahid Mirza: English

Produced by Lahore Chitrkar, 2007

New at Uddari

View Cultural Events Page for information on South Asian Peoples Unity Conference organized by South Asian Peoples Forum (SAPF), and scheduled to be held in Toronto in October 2008; The 9th Annual Deepak Binning Walk-a-Thon in Vancouver on Sunday June 8, 11am at King George Park followed by the Westcoast Bhangra Festival; The dateline for This Magazine’s 12th Annual Great Canadian Literary Hunt is July 2, 2008.
View oil paintings, water color and sculptures by Shahid Mirza and Kanwal Dhaliwal at Uddari Art Exhibition.

Slumbering Over Islamic Unity

A widespread occurrence of deep sleep, napping, snoozing, dozing and blissful slumber has been witnessed by heidariam.blogfa.com during the sessions of the 21st International Conference on Islamic Unity in Tehran held May 4 to 6 this year.

According to a story posted May 5th, 2008 by Mudassir Rizwan, Muslim Ulema from Oman, Sudan, Egypt, Indonesia, Pakistan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Germany, the US, Tunisia, Syria, Saudi Arabia, France, Morocco, India, Algeria, Hong Kong, Qatar, Britain, Denmark, Iraq, Turkey, Gambia, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, and the United Arab Emirates are participating; over a hundred articles from foreign and domestic authors have been received by the secretariat of the conference of which 70 articles have been selected for presentation, he said.
“Preparing grounds for unity and solidarity of the Muslim World and bringing closer various cultural and scientific views are major goals of the conference. The participants are also to promote coexistence and find way out of current obstacles including the enemies’ plots and secular thoughts. The Islamic unity charter which has so far been signed by over 2,000 Muslim thinkers and scholars will be studied by the delegates.”

Here, find the Umah in action.

From waging heroic struggle against the onSlumber Image 015salught of sleep

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To a continued resistance against it;

Slumber Image 011

From hiding faces

Slumber Image 009

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To Giving in;

Slumber Image 010

From going overboard,

Slumber Image 004

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To blissfulness,

Slumber Image 008

To an invitation to an open slumber party.

Slumber Image 003

No wonder, people in North America are inquiring about the materials those chairs and tables are made of; about the general environment of that place in Tehran; about the sounds heard by the participants; and, indeed the ideas discussed by the presenters. Their quest is to adopt or improvise the methods used in this Conference to bring sleep to millions of sleepless North American. This can be a breakthrough for consumers who are spending fortunes on sleep-inducing and anti-depressant drugs, on special mattresses and beds, pillows and pillow covers, and on slumber music and videos.

Keep our fingers crossed.

Information sent to Uddari by Shahid Mirza of Lahore Chitrkar.

More on Islamic Unity
I need my sleep!

2. Royalties for Punjabi Language Authors

After the first post, i received some feedback questioning the need to raise the issue of royalties for authors of MaaNboli mothertongue languages, and asking why even after getting royalty on my novel Skeena, i am still keeping on about it.

It is the historic discrimination faced by MaaNboli languages in Pakistan where most of the meager resources earmarked for the development of languages, art and literature are awarded to the ‘national’ language Urdu at the expense of all local languages. So now the MaaNboli literary organizations, authors and publishers of Punjab (Punjabi, Seraiki, Potohari), Sind (Sindhi, Behari), Balochistan (Balochi, Brahvi) and the NWFP (Pushto, Pukhto) face depreciation due to the persistent non-recognition of native languages by national and provincial cultural agencies. It is a miracle performed by writers, intellectuals and publishers of maaNboli literature that any of our languages have survived the last sixty one years of Pakistani politics.

Punjabi writers and publishers, artists and patrons, musicians/dancers and producers are facing decreasing markets and lesser value for their creative work and hardship because of the ever-increasing conservatism of the political environment that does not encourage or allow creativity in art and literature. Nahid Siddiqui, a master of Kathak classical dance, and i assure you there aren’t many left in the country, does not get a chance to perform on stage or on television very often; and so, she sustains herself with a percentage of student fees from her dance classes with a community-based non-profit cultural organization that struggles each month to pay its own bills in the absence of any core funding or structural support.

The perpetual lack of government funding and public resources has pushed Punjabi cultural communities to operate at ‘charitable’ levels from before the Partition of 1947; and, now the defensive strategy once adopted to help the ailing art and literary institutions recover, has become the only ‘possible’ way to continue. This has flung most Punjabi literary organizations into an overall low-lying introvert stance where work is valiantly carried on even in the absence of ‘basic necessities’ such as scanners and printers. A living example of it appeared in my inbox yesterday in the form of a general request to help fundraise for Publisher/Distributor Kitab Trinjan to get a UPS, a printer and a scanner (For more information and to extend your support, email Zubair Ahmed at kitab.trinjan@gmail.com).

I had the unique opportunity to travel within Pakistan from May to August last year to launch my novel Skeena; and, it was most rejuvenating to meet poets, fiction writers, prose writers, publishers, musicians and cultural/social activists in nine different places including my own city of Lahore. This was made possible by many individuals and organizations but most of all by Amjad Salim of Sanjh Publications who took a big step forward by launching what may well be the first actual promotion campaign for a Punjabi book in the Punjab; Columnist Hasan Nisar who gave the campaign his unconditional support by dropping the first cash donation; Mohammad Tahseen of South Asia Partnership (SAP) who supported the Campaign by approving funds for it. I am most grateful to the cultural communities of Gujranwala, Kot Adu, Multan, Sargodha, Islamabad, Jhung, Karachi, Hyderabad and Lahore who supported this action by organizing the events to launch ‘Skeena’ in their cities.

My gains are unlimited. Just getting the feel of different places and meeting some of the most inspiring people there would have been enough for me but i got luckier than ever; great exchange of ideas, strong cultural impacts, heated discussions, hot and cold weathers, home-cooked foods, great Hasheesh, and no kidding. On the question of royalties, most authors and publishers said that since Punjabi books do not sell it will be meaningless to ask for or grant royalties to authors; some reject the very idea of running a self-sustained Punjabi publishing business as being a ‘commercial’ and so negative activity while others feel it will be impossible to make a Punjabi literary publishing business a commercial success in a market catering to Urdu and English.

The most important factor in resolving this situation is to push for language reforms as has been suggested by Shahid Mirza in his comment on Uddari-Home: “It is so unfortunate that in the new provincial assembly there is no party/individual/group to voice the right of children to study in the mother tongue. maybe we need to start a signature campaign to promote the cause”; and, the comments made by Shumita Madan Didi here, and there. As well, this is the reason for Publisher Amjad Salim and I to launch an extended promotion campaign for Skeena that included discussion on language rights, and for Mohammad Tahseen, and others to support it. I believe that winning author royalties for Punjabi writers is an important part of developing Punjabi language and literature.

The sentiment behind rejecting the concept of author royalties is well expressed by Author Amarjit Chandan in his comment on the previous post: “…In principle there can’t be any debate about royalty rights for Punjabi writers. A Punjabi writer should assert his/her rights while dealing with big publishers, but sadly we don not have any in Punjabi book industry.” I understand this view but do not share it; to me, its not a question of whether a publisher is big or not, an author is ‘successful’ or not, a publisher is ‘commercial’ or not. “Everyone has the right to the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which (s)he is the author.” (UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 27). It is a matter of human rights; of how creative work is used and valued in a society; of how creators of art and literature are recognized for their work. To me, it is important to see that a system contains at least a semblance of the ‘possibility’ for writers and artists to sustain ourselves through our creative work; and, may also improve the quality of our work as suggested by Jatinder in her comment.

Amarjit Jee further says, “I belong to the old tribe of writers who wrote and published for the love of it without asking for any reward.” Yes, in South Asia as elsewhere, writing has been a noble profession and the profession of the nobility as it required not just intellect but also education, a commodity still inaccessible to a large majority of people. I shirk from it also because it reminds me of all those other ‘recommended’ and ‘favored’ roles that are created to dupe people into feeling good about themselves while they are made to serve larger vested interests; for example, the ‘sublime motherhood’ concept for women where a woman is prompted to negate all other aspects of her person to fulfill that one role.

In the absence of royalties, what do writers do? Depend on local monarchs where available, find affluent patrons and befriend wealthy printers; Have dual careers, self-publish through an established publisher, and stay in a position of acute valuelessness for being an author who is often reminded that her/his creative work is not read by many; few want to buy it; and, the publisher is taking a loss by printing it. That reminds me of Poet Arshad Malik in Sargodha who would not publish his collection of poetry because “Ke faida? whats the use?” he said; Mushtaq Sufi, a poet of unique sensibilities who has stopped writing poetry; Painter Shahid Mirza who may have canvases ready for six exhibitions but has not exhibited his work in years outside of his own Lahore Chitrkar, “ke faida?” he says.

In every city, i met some creative artists, poets, writers, singers, dancers who are working on their art day and night without hope to publish, perform or exhibit their creations. I am clear that this situation is caused by larger political realities where literary and cultural communities suffer as a whole regardless of their role in it. But the publishers and producers of Punjabi art and literature in Pakistani Punjab though miraculous in sustaining maaNboli languages, can not continue to overlook the negative impacts on their communities of their non-recognition of creative and intellectual rights. Seen from my perspective, this non-recognition mirrors the same model of projected valuelessness to authors of native languages and literature that is projected by the larger mainstream society in relation to native languages and cultural communities; the model that we are all fighting against.

Meanwhile, we are all in a bind and at this end, even authors who are not dependent on Punjabi publishers feel slighted by them, “Lugda ai Punjab de publishraaN agay sadee koi value nahiN” (It seems punjabi publishers do not value us) says Poet/Playwright Ajmer Rode of Vancouver who has worked with publishers both in India and Canada.

Punjabi Authors and Publishers Page brings this discussion together.
books on Punjab