Welcome Radical Desi in Surrey this Sunday March 23/14

Uddari welcomes the launch of Radical Desi, a new monthly magazine, and congratulates Gurpreet Singh and his team for initiating it. Below is the cover page of the first issue, an introduction and some information about its launching ceremony tommorrow.

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Radical Desi
Monthly magazine on alternative politics
Official Launch
Sunday, March 23, 2014
2-5 pm
Dr. Ambedkar Room (418)
City Centre Library
10350 University Drive, Surrey

The launching ceremony will be held during Dialogue on Bhagat Singh’s Atheism. Those on the panel will include the author of Naastik Basni and a known atheist Sadhu Binning, the Centre for Inquiry leader Pat O’ Brien and the leader of the Canadian Taraksheel Sabha, Avtar Gill.

Get free copies of the first edition of Radical Desi at the event. Those who are unable to attend will have an option to grab free copies at the parade being organized by the Guru Ravidas Sikh Temple in Burnaby on Saturday, March 22, 2014 and also at the annual community march against racism in Vancouver near Cambie and Hastings the same day.

We encourage everyone to be there at 1:30 pm as we plan to start the event at 2 pm sharp. Each panelist will be given 20 minutes to speak. The panel discussion will be followed by Q&A session.

Bhagat Singh was a towering Indian revolutionary- who was hanged by the British Indian government alongside Sukhdev and Rajguru on March 23, 1931. Bhagat Singh died as an atheist, yet there are attempts to appropriate his struggle by the religious fundamentalists within the South Asian community. The discussion on atheism and free thinking on his martyrdom day will be a fitting tribute to him. Please join us and feel free to ask questions to continue the dialogue that is necessary for the progress of humanity.

For more information on both events:
Gurpreet Singh, Director
Radical Desi Publications Ltd.
Phone: 778-862-2454
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Hindi and Urdu: Sa’adat Hasan Manto

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This is Muhammad Umar Memon’s translation of an article by Sa’adat Hasan Manto.

The translation first appeared in The Annual of Urdu Studies.The Hindi-Urdu dispute has been raging for some time now. Maulvi Abdul Haq Sahib, Dr Tara Singh and Mahatma Gandhi know what there is to know about this dispute. For me, though, it has so far remained incomprehensible. Try as hard as I might, I just haven’t been able to understand. Why are Hindus wasting their time supporting Hindi, and why are Muslims so beside themselves over their preservation of Urdu? A language is not made, it makes itself. And no amount of human effort can ever kill a language. When I tried to write something about this current hot issue, I ended up with the following long conversation:Munshi Narain Parshad:  Iqbal Sahib, are you going to drink this soda water?

Mirza Muhammad Iqbal: Yes, I am.

Munshi: Why dont you drink lemon?

Iqbal: No particular reason. I just like soda water. At our house, everyone likes to drink it.

Munshi: In other words, you hate lemon.

Iqbal: Oh, not at all. Why would I hate it, Munshi Narain Parshad? Since everyone at home drinks soda water, I’ve sort of grown accustomed to it. That’s all. But if you ask me, actually lemon tastes better than plain soda.

Munshi: That is precisely why I was surprised hat you would prefer something salty over something sweet. and lemon isn’t just sweet, it has a nice flavour. What do you think?

Iqbal: You are absolutely right, but…

Munshi: But what?

Iqbal: Nothing. I was just going to say that I’ll take soda.

Munshi: Same nonsense again. I’m not forcing you to drink poison, am I? Brother, what’s the difference between the two? Both bottles are made in the same factory after all. The same machine has poured water into them. If you take the sweetness and flavour out of the lemon, what’s left?

Iqbal: Just soda… a kind of salty water…

Munshi: Then, what’s the harm in drinking the lemon?

Iqbal: No harm at all.

Munshi: Then drink!

Iqbal: And what will you drink?

Munshi: I’ll send for another bottle.

Iqbal: Why would you send for another bottle? What’s the harm in drinking plain soda?

Munshi: N… n… no harm.

Iqbal: So then, here, drink the soda water.

Munshi: And what will you drink?

Iqbal: I’ll get another bottle.

Munshi: Why would you send for another bottle? What’s the harm in drinking lemon?

Iqbal: N… n… no harm. And what’s the harm in drinking soda?

Munshi: None at all.

Iqbal: The fact is, soda is rather good.

Munshi: But I think that lemon… is rather good.

Iqbal: Perhaps, if you say so. Although I’ve heard all along from my elders that soda is rather good.

Munshi: Now what’s a person to make of this: I’ve heard all along from my elders that lemon is rather good.

Iqbal: But what’s your own opinion?

Munshi: And what’s yours?

Iqbal: My opinion… hum… my opinion. My opinion is just this… but why don’t you tell me your opinion?

Munshi: My opinion… hum… my opinion is just this… but why should I tell it first?

Iqbal: I don’t think we’ll get anywhere this way. Look, just put a lid on your glass. I’ll do the same. Then we’ll discuss the matter leisurely.

Munshi: No, we can’t do that. I’ve already popped the caps off the bottles. We’ll just have to drink. Come on, make up your mind, before all the fizz is gone. These drinks are worthless without the fizz.

Iqbal: I agree. And at least you do agree that there’s no real difference between lemon and soda.

Munshi: When did I ever say that? There’s plenty of difference. They’re as different as night and day. Lemon is sweet, flavourful, tart-three things more than soda. Soda only has fizz, and that’s so strong it just barges into the nose. By comparison, lemon is very tasty. One bottle and you feel fresh for hours. Generally, soda water is for sick people. Besides, you’ve just admitted yourself that lemon tends to be tastier than soda.

Iqbal: Well, that I did. But I never said that lemon is better than soda. Tasty doesn’t mean that a thing is also beneficial. Take achaar, it’s very tasty, but you already know about its harmful effects. he presence of sweetness and tartness doesn’t prove that something is good. If you cnsulted a doctor he would tell you the harm lemon does to the stomach. But soda, that’s something else. The thing is, it helps digestion.

Munshi: Look, we can settle the matter by mixing the two.

Iqbal: I have no objection to that.

Munshi: Well, then, fill this glass halfway with soda.

Iqbal: Why don’t you fill half the glass with your lemon? I’ll pour my soda after that.

Munshi: Makes no sense. Why don’t you pour your soda first?

Iqbal: Because I want to drink soda-lemon mixed.

Munshi: And I want lemon-soda mixed.

By Shivam Vij. Reproduced from Minds@UW and posted December 5, 2011 in “Kafila” at http://kafila.org/2011/12/05/hindi-and-urdu-saadat-hasan-manto/

Poetry and the State – London UK – Sept 20/11

From 6.30PM
On Tuesday 20th September 2011
At Amnesty International UK
17-25 New Inn Yard
London EC2A 3EA
The event will start promptly at 7pm

Poet in the City and Amnesty International are delighted to invite you to an evening celebrating the launch of the new edition of Modern Poetry in Translation, Poetry and the State.

From the beginning, poetry has been the great communicator. In every protest, conflict and movement of oppression, voices have risen through the crowd and found expression in its fearless form. Whether personal or political, poetry is a public statement with a universal reach.

The event will be hosted by David Constantine and Helen Constantine, co-editors of Modern Poetry in Translation. Both are experienced and widely published translators in their own right and David is an acclaimed poet and short story writer.

Guest speakers will include the poets Amarjit Chandan and Jennie Feldman, writer Tim Allen and translator Zuzanna Olszewska, and Amnesty?s new poet in residence Carlos Reyez Manzo.

Poet in the City is a registered charity committed to attracting new audiences to poetry, making new connections for poetry, and raising money to support poetry education, in particular the placing of poets in schools.

Charity Commission number 1117354,
Company limited by guarantee 05819413.
For more information about the charity telephone 07908 367488
Email info@poetinthecity.co.uk
Website at www.poetinthecity.co.uk
Or write to Poet in the City
c/o Cathy Galvin/Anmar Frangoul
News International
3 Thomas More Square, London E98 1XY.
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Call for Submissions: Vallum Magazine for Pakistani Poetry-Aug 31/11

Vallum Magazine is featuring a special issue on PAKISTANI POETRY
(Vol. 9:1 fall/winter 2011)

VALLUM 9:1 – PAKISTANThis special edition of Vallum will feature poetry, essays, and/or interviews from a Pakistani origin or perspective.

Also seeking submissions of unpublished work on any aspect of Pakistani poetry by Canadian or Landed Immigrants of Pakistani origin or Canadians interested in Pakistan.

DEADLINE: August 31, 2011

http://www.vallummag.com/upcoming_issues.html

General Submission Guidelines
Vallum magazine is interested in poetry, prose poems, concrete poems, essays, interviews and reviews on poetry.

Length of submissions
Poetry : 4-7 poems Essay : 5-6 pages
Interview : 3-5 pages
Review : 1-3 pages
Letter to the editor : up to 1 page
Art : B&W or colour (art work must be available in high-resolution printout or electronic format.)

Vallum is interested in work that is
Original and previously unpublished.
Poetry that’s fresh and edgy, something that reflects contemporary experience and is also well-crafted.
Open to most styles – experimental and traditional.

Acquires First North American Serial Rights.
No simultaneous submissions.
Essay and review submissions must follow North American, MLA Style guidelines. Artwork can be colour and/or black and white. Colour is preferred for covers; black and white preferred to be featured inside magazine, but will consider colour.
Vallum is published twice a year.
Poems are accepted by regular mail only.
Essays, reviews, interviews, letters to the editor and art work can be sent by regular mail or through our Online Submission page.

SEND TO
Vallum
P.O. Box 598, Victoria Stn
Montreal, Quebec
H3Z 2Y6
Canada

SUBMIT ONLINE
http://www.vallummag.com/submissions/
Vallum Society for Arts & Letters Education
http://www.vallummag.com/submission.html.
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