About

Punjabi word ‘uddari’ was common enough but had not captured me till Author Zubair Ahmad suggested it as ‘khyal uddari’ for ‘imagination’ in my novel ‘Skeena’. Later, i mentioned it to Author/Editor Maqsood Saqib (Monthly Pancham, and Suchet Kitab Ghar, Lahore) as a title for a proposed journal of Punjabi writings; ‘Uddari!’ Maqsood Saqib slashed the ‘khyal’ in his most decisive tones. So, uddari it is.

Uddari Weblog is a place to discuss issues such as the status of languages, royalty rights of writers, support for the publishers, and whatever is in between.

(‘Urraan’ in Urdu. ‘Airborne, soaring, in the air, on the wing, taking off, taking to the air’.)

Fauzia Zohra Rafique
.

truck-adda-smirza
Header Image & Gravatar from
Truck Art by Shahid Mirza

.

Site maintained by
Uddari Web

.

Authors/Contributors

2014-2016

Mahmood Awan, Ireland

Amarjit Chandan, UK

Roop Dhillon, UK

Randeep Singh Purewall, Canada

Fauzia Rafique, Canada

Ijaz Syed, USA

2012-2014

Amarjit Chandan, UK

Randeep Singh Purewall, Canada

Fauzia Rafique, Canada

Ijaz Syed, USA

2010-2012

Amarjit Chandan, UK

Shahid Mirza, Pakistan

Randeep Singh Purewall, Canada

Fauzia Rafique, Canada

Afzal Saahir, Pakistan

Ijaz Syed, USA

2008-2010

Afzal Saahir, Pakistan

Amarjit Chandan, UK

Sukant Chandan, UK

Rubya Mehdi, Denmark

Shahid Mirza, Pakistan

Hoori Noorani, Pakistan

Fauzia Rafique, Canada

Ijaz Syed, USA
.

Uddari Sites/Blogs
Earthpoems
Love Life
Uddari Art
.

50,000 Views for Uddari Weblog in 2010
A Hundred Thousand Visits for Uddari
Brilliante Punjab: Offering to a writer, an editor, and a reader!
Most viewed Uddari posts 2008-2009
Uddari is One
Uddari gets (a piece of) the ‘Brilliante Weblog Award’!
.

This blog is created by Fauzia Zohra Rafique
from Vancouver Lower Mainland, an area established
on the unceded territories of Satesh Salish peoples
in the Canadian province of British Columbia.

Contact:
frafique@gmail.com
Fauzia’s Places on the Net:
gandholi.wordpress.com
facebook author page
@RafiqueFauzia
.

Creative Commons License
Uddari Weblog by Uddari is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License
based on works at uddari.wordpress.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license
may be available at uddariweb@gmail.com.
.
.

Advertisements

13 comments on “About

  1. Blood-Ink-Diary says:

    Fauzia, I relish your blog — we seem to be having akin interests in literature and subjects. My blog is fairly new and am slowly uploading subjects I fancy.
    Cheers, Shaheen

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Without a doubt a great article, it is seems like what I’m looking for.

    Thanks for sharing

    Like

  3. […] member of Ghadar Party, died today in Birmingham, UK. He was 102 years old.’ A comment at Uddari Home this morning from Bharat Bhushan paash.wordpress.com Waiting for more. . Added: Talking about a […]

    Like

  4. bhushan says:

    Baba Bhagat Singh Bilga, the last surviving member of Ghadar Party died today in Birmingham UK.He was 102 years old.

    Like

  5. […] campaign to promote the cause.’ Posted by: Chitrkar from lahorechitrkar@gmail.com On: Uddari Home, Uddari Mudhla Warqa Submitted: 2008/04/07 at […]

    Like

  6. rana nayar says:

    Friends
    I find myself turning into a blogger of sorts. I have created a blog of my own and would like all my friends to visit it sometime, as and when they can. You may visit me on http//:fromacrosstheshores.blogspot.com.
    Hope to get your comments on the materia poted there.
    Regards
    Rana Nayar

    Like

  7. rana nayar says:

    Punjabi Language, Punjabiyat and the Punjab Government

    By Rana Nayar

    Only last month, the Punjab government has successfully pushed through two Acts; the ‘Punjab Official Languages Act’ (2008), and the ‘Punjab Learning of Punjabi and other Languages Act’ (2008). While the stated purpose of the first is to make the use of Punjabi mandatory within the official circles, that of the second is to make Punjabi compulsory up to class X in both the government and private schools.
    As this has been done in fulfillment of one of the electoral promises of the Akali Dal, understandably the Acts in question are being hailed as major victory, especially by the ruling party. It is also hoped that these Acts shall promote the use of Punjabi in the official circles as well as educational institutions, for they carry the provision of punitive action against the defaulters.
    Now that the bills have already become Acts, it would be churlish, if not entirely futile, to debate over their merits or demerits. But as these Acts are likely to have some far-reaching ramifications for the Punjabi language and Punjabiyat, both of which are very close to the heart of every true-blue Punjabi, among whom I also count myself, the present intervention becomes absolutely necessary.
    Though I’m ready to express cautious optimism about the efficacy of these measures, I find it difficult to share in the enthusiasm, even euphoria of the ruling party. Rather I’m saddened by the fact that it has taken us some sixty-odd years to initiate such steps for the promotion of Punjabi language, that too, in the land of its birth. Even if one were to grant the fact that this couldn’t have possibly been done until the Reorganization of the States in the region, this measure has come a forty years too late in the day.
    Of course, the successive governments in the Punjab do owe it to the people to explain why it took them so long to wake up to the importance of Punjabi language? To put the record straight, one must mention that it was the Lachman Singh Gill ministry that introduced, even passed a similar bill in 1967, of course, minus the punitive action. One wonders why the earlier efforts in this regard failed to produce the desired results. One is also tempted to ask, legitimately, if the Act of 2008 has managed to plug all the loopholes that the earlier one was riddled with.
    Going beyond, one may also like to ask, if at all, there is one-to-one correspondence between the legislative measures and the promotion of language. To my mind, there are lessons to be drawn from the aggressive manner in which the Central government has sought to promote Hindi as an official language through a series of legislative measures. Though the ‘Official Languages Act’ was promulgated as far back as 1963, and has since been used to promote (read ‘impose’) Hindi across the length and breadth of this country, it has failed to wear down the resistance of the Southern States to the extent it was expected to. If anything, the resistance to Hindi has only grown, not lessened over the years.
    In fact, if there is one thing that has worked to the advantage of Hindi down South, it’s not the Act of 1963, but the ever-growing popularity of Bollywood. It wouldn’t not be wrong to say, it’s Bollywood that has done much more for the promotion of Hindi in the Southern States than all the governmental efforts put together. Strange though it may seem, there is a very important lesson to be drawn from this: that the popular media such as films and television can perhaps do much more to enhance the acceptability or popularity of a particular language than legislative measures ever could.
    This brings me to another point. If we were to look through the history of languages, we shall discover that whenever efforts were made to install a particular language as the official language, it lost out on its popular appeal. Languages always reside in the hearts and minds of the people willing to own them up, and not in the drab, official documents and records. Besides, people generally tend to offer resistance to whatever they perceive as an imposition, be it language, religion, or culture. The other Act that aims to make Punjabi compulsory in both the government and private schools may also have limited impact, as it would remain restricted to the literates.
    Undoubtedly, no language can flourish without state patronage, but state patronage alone can not ensure either its survival or its continuation, and much less its promotion and popularity. To my mind, the Punjab government would do well to remember this simple lesson of history while promoting Punjabi language through state patronage. Moreover, it also needs to bear in mind that the promotion of Punjabi and/or Punjabiyat may not be possible, without raising the level of literacy from its current 69% to, at least, 90%, if not 100%. It has to be realized that those who are out of this loop may be able to speak Punjabi, but sadly enough, can not read or write their own language.
    This only means that, as far as this goes, we need to adopt a two-pronged strategy. If on the one hand, we need to initiate and sustain a state-wide, adult education programme, on the other, there is an urgent need to tone up our system of elementary education, especially in the rural and semi-urban areas, where the learning/teaching of Punjabi leaves a lot to be desired. One only has to look at the primitive, pre-modern ways in which the Punjabi language is being taught in the government schools or relate to the deficient manner in which the children often display their reading, writing or other related skills to realize the grimness of the situation. The whole purpose of promoting Punjabi is likely to be defeated, if semi-literates are all we manage to produce in Punjabi.
    Besides, we need to strengthen the library network in the small towns and villages of Punjab. Even in those areas where the literacy rates are somewhat better than what they are in other places, people do not have access to a well-organized library network, with the latest editions of ‘readable books’ in Punjabi. It is a well-known fact that often libraries, especially in the backwaters, are used as dumping grounds for eminently unreadable books and the books that people often want to read are simply not there. Absence of a well-knit library network is bound to work against the cause of both Punjabi and Punjabiyat. Somewhere the promotion of Punjabi journalism, films and television also deserves as much attention as some other measures do.
    In a nutshell, the Punjab government needs to back up its effort at introducing the Acts of 2008 with a series of related measures, if it really is sincere about promoting both Punjabi and Punjabiyat. For if it fails to do so, it may legitimately be accused of playing politics, a folly that future generations may find rather hard to forgive us for.
    _______________________________________________________
    The writer is Professor of English at Panjab University, Chandigarh. He may be contacted at rananayar@gmail.com

    Like

  8. mirza says:

    Another sad fact, of all the newly elected provincial assemblies, Punjab has the distinction that not even one member used Punjabi to take oath, while members of Sindh, Baluchistan and NWFP assemblies took oaths in all possible dialects and languages.

    Like

  9. Lovely to find this blog! Will visit frequently. Hi, Fauzia :).

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Shumita Madan Didi says:

    Mainu bahut ajeeb laggeya si ke Punjabi skoolaa’n ch nahi parhayee jaandi. Je kittey eho haal East Punjab ch hunda taa’n mae’nu jinni ku parhni aundi ae uh vi reh jaandi. Saahnu te ghamm ae ke urdu nahi parhayee gayee so assi’n nastaliq script to’n vaanjh ho gaye..jiss script vich merey papa likhde sann uh saahto’n dur keeti gayee systematically
    mae’n pakistani punjabi dostaa’n di barhi shukarguzaar haa’n..maa’nboli da pyar hor nikhar geya ae iss mulaqat to’n baad

    Liked by 1 person

  11. fauziar says:

    Yes, let us draw a petition to assert the right of children to study in their mother tongue, maaNboli. Also because UNESCO lists Punjabi as one of the languages that is expected to become extinct in fifty years. It makes me feel strange; as if i was someone who was focused on keeping the roof on top when the foundation was withering away under my feet.

    Like

  12. chitrkar says:

    It is so unfortunate that in the new provincial assembly there is no party/individual/group to voice the right of children to study in the mother tongue. maybe we need to start a signature campaign to promote the cause.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s